History

Attendance (10,326)

The Alex Box Stadium, Skip Bertman Field experience is a unique one, created by the greatest and most loyal fans in all of college baseball, combined with an enduring legacy of championships.

In February 2009, the LSU Baseball program moved into a new home, and all of the traditions, memories and excitement that make Tiger baseball truly special live on in the New Alex Box Stadium.

From LSU’s first SEC title team in ‘39, to Bruce Baudier’s perfect game, to Rich Cordani’s game-winning home run against Southern Cal, to the regional championship victory laps of the 1990s, the original Alex Box Stadium was home from 1938-2008 to some of the greatest moments in all of college baseball history.

Now the LSU baseball legacy has moved 200 yards to the south into a state-of-the-art facility, designed to provide the resources necessary to sustain LSU’s tradition of excellence while also accommodating in comfort the record-setting crowds that set Tiger Baseball apart from the rest of America.

In the New Box, the Tiger baseball team enjoys nearly 10,000 square-feet of locker and meeting room space, new batting cages and all the amenities necessary to field a consistent winner.

A 21st Century home has opened for a grand old tradition … LSU Baseball at Alex Box Stadium, Skip Bertman Field.

LSU has finished first in the nation in total attendance for 24 straight seasons. In 2019, the Tigers drew 425,377 fans in the 11th season of their current stadium — Alex Box Stadium, Skip Bertman Field — which opened in 2009.

LSU has been among the nation’s attendance leaders for the past 29 seasons, finishing No. 5 in 1991, No. 6 in 1992, No. 4 in 1993, No. 3 in 1994 and in 1995, and No. 1 from 1996-2019.

Over the past 36 seasons, the Tigers have attracted over nine million fans to their home stadium. A total of 9,217,512 patrons have watched the Tigers play at “The Box” from 1984 to 2019.

Alex Box Stadium, Skip Bertman Field – which opened in 2009 – has played host to eight NCAA regionals and seven NCAA super regionals in 11 seasons. The field at “The Box” was named Skip Bertman Field in May 2013.

The original Alex Box Stadium was the site of four SEC tournaments, 18 NCAA regionals, four NCAA super regionals and one ABCA Hall of Fame tournament.

Originally a 2,500-seat facility, the concrete and steel grandstand of the original Alex Box Stadium was completed in 1938. Funding came from the Works Progress Administration, a federally sponsored agency which constructed public athletic facilities, among other such projects.

In its first two years, the original Alex Box Stadium was the site of spring training for the New York Giants. Such legendary baseball figures as Mel Ott, Carl Hubbell, Bill Terry and Dick Bartell trained at “The Box.”

Alex Box Stadium, Skip Bertman Field Information

Stadium Name: Alex Box Stadium (dedicated May 29, 1943, at previous stadium location on the west side of across LA Highway 30 from, across from Tiger Stadium)
Field Name: Skip Bertman Field (dedicated May 17, 2013)
Seating Capacity: 10,326
Playing Field Distances
– Foul Lines: 330 ft.
– Power Alleys: 365 ft.
– Center: 405 ft.
Height of Fence: 10 ft.
Height of Batters’ Eye: 30 ft.
Playing Surface: natural grass (artificial turf in foul territories)

Ground Level
National Championship Plaza
Ticket Office
Club Lounge
LSU Locker Room and Squad Room
Umpires Locker Room
Batting Cages
LSU SportShop
Concession Stands
Two Picnic / Play Areas

Second Level
Concourse
Concession Stands
LSU SportShop
LSU Fan Zone

Third Level
Press Box
Suites

“Old” vs. “New” Alex Box Stadium – Ballpark Comparisons

Enhanced ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) accessibility and seating throughout new facility.

Original Alex Box
New Alex Box
7,760
Seating
10,326
2,800
Grandstand (under roof)
4,054
4,522
Bleachers
6,272
2,000 sq. ft.
Restrooms
9,274 sq. ft.
2,200 sq. ft.
Concessions
5,000 sq. ft.
N/A
Arcade
500 sq. ft.
0
Suites
27 (8,588 sq. ft.)
0 sq. ft.
Club Lounge
1,800 sq. ft.
3,000 sq. ft.
Team Area
9,380 sq. ft.
250 sq. ft.
Press Area
2,000 sq. ft.

Tournaments Hosted

NCAA Regional Tournaments (26): 1986, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2008, 2009, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2019
NCAA Super Regional Series (11): 2000, 2003, 2004, 2008, 2009, 2012, 2013, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2019
SEC Tournaments (4): 1985, 1986, 1991, 1993
ABCA Hall of Fame Tournament (1): 1991

Top 10 Paid* Attendance Figures at New Alex Box Stadium (through 2019 season)

Rank Attendance Opponent Date Winner, Score
1. 12,844 Notre Dame 2/16/18 LSU, 7-6
2. 12,727 South Carolina 4/27/2013 USC, 4-2
3. 12,472 New Orleans 2/14/14 LSU, 2-0
4. 12,404 ULM 2/15/19 LSU, 12-7
5. 12,373 Maryland 2/15/2013 LSU, 1-0
6. 12,313 Alabama 4/17/2010 LSU, 9-7
7. 12,223 Notre Dame 2/17/18 ND, 10-5
8. 12,193 Ole Miss 5/17/2013 LSU, 5-4
9. 12,164 Ole Miss 3/13/15 UM, 5-3
10. 12,153 # Oklahoma 6/8/2013 LSU, 11-1

# – The largest actual attendance figure in the current Alex Box Stadium is 11,401 for Game 2 of the NCAA Super Regional matching LSU and Oklahoma on June 8, 2013.

The largest actual attendance figure in the original Alex Box Stadium was 8,173 for the NCAA Super Regional championship game versus UC Irvine on June 9, 2008, the final game in stadium history. The largest paid attendance figure in the original stadium was 8,701 versus Mississippi State on May 11, 2008, the final regular-season game in stadium history.

LSU’s Record in the Alex Box Stadium

(known as “LSU Diamond” from 1938 until dedicated on May 29, 1943)

Season Home Games W-L-T Pct.
1938 10 6-4 .600
1939 15 13-2 .867
1940 15 12-3 .800
1941 18 9-9 .500
1942 8 4-4 .500
1943 8 5-3 .625
1944 5 2-3 .400
1945 6 5-1 .833
1946 7 7-0 1.000
1947 13 7-5-1 .577
1948 12 5-6-1 .458
1949 11 5-6 .455
1950 6 4-2 .667
1951 10 8-2 .800
1952 7 5-2 .714
1953 12 6-6 .500
1954 11 6-5 .545
1955 11 3-8 .273
1956 11 6-5 .545
1957 11 6-5 .545
1958 15 9-6 .600
1959 15 10-5 .667
1960 13 7-6 .538
1961 13 11-2 .846
1962 16 11-4-1 .719
1963 12 6-6 .500
1964 14 5-8-1 .393
1965 11 6-5 .545
1966 12 5-7 .417
1967 16 12-4 .750
1968 20 13-7 .650
1969 21 7-14 .333
1970 21 10-11 .476
1971 19 11-8 .579
1972 27 18-9 .667
1973 19 13-6 .684
1974 24 16-8 .667
1975 37 29-8 .784
1976 22 13-9 .591
1977 31 15-16 .484
1978 26 10-16 .385
1979 31 25-6 .806
1980 26 17-9 .654
1981 30 18-12 .600
1982 29 20-9 .690
1983 31 19-12 .613
1984 31 23-8 .742
1985 33 30-3 .909
1986 43 38-5 .884
1987 34 29-5 .853
1988 33 27-6 .818
1989 36 31-5 .861
1990 37 32-5 .865
1991 43 33-10 .767
1992 38 30-8 .789
1993 43 34-8-1 .802
1994 35 28-7 .800
1995 36 28-8 .778
1996 39 32-7 .821
1997 40 36-4 .900
1998 35 32-3 .914
1999 38 27-11 .711
2000 39 28-11 .718
2001 37 27-10 .730
2002 35 27-8 .771
2003 39 30-8-1 .782
2004 36 27-9 .750
2005 36 23-13 .639
2006 37 25-12 .676
2007 35 20-14-1 .586
2008 42 32-9-1 .774
Original Alex Box Stadium Totals
(1938-2008)
1,688 1,189-491-8 .707
2009 42 33-9 .786
2010 38 30-8 .789
2011 37 28-9 .757
2012 44 35-9 .795
2013 43 39-4 .907
2014 39 31-7-1 .808
2015 39 33-6 .846
2016 41 28-13 .683
2017 39 32-7 .821
2018 37 29-8 .784
2019 40 30-10 .750
2020 13 11-2 .846
2021
“New” Alex Box Stadium Totals (2008-20) 452 359-92-1 .795
LSU Home Games (1938-2020) 2,140 1548-583-9 .725

Total Attendance in Alex Box Stadium (1984-2013)

Year Dates Attendance Average
1984 24 22,021 918
1985 25 40,746 1,630
1986 34 81,075 2,385
1987 27 46,084 1,707
1988 27 46,831 1,734
1989 33 65,781 1,993
1990 30 78,616 2,621
1991 37 113,832 3,077
1992 34 114,937 3,381
1993 39 137,306 3,521
1994 33 143,595 4,351
1995 36 148,995 4,139
1996 39 226,805 5,816
1997 39 252,864 6,484
1998 35 232,597 6,645
1999 38 271,888 7,154
2000 39 286,874 7,355
2001 37 276,622 7,476
2002 36 271,179 7,532
2003 39 291,676 7,478
2004 36 284,328 7,898
2005 36 270,300 7,508
2006 37 270,341 7,306
2007 35 256,537 7,329
2008 42 318,798 7,590
Original Alex Box 867 4,550,628 5,249
2009 42 403,056 9,596
2010 38 404,916 10,655
2011 37 390,595 10,556
2012 44 472,391 10,736
2013 43 473,298 11,006
2014 39 424,321 10,880
2015 39 421,771 10,814
2016 41 433,783 10,580
2017 39 418,291 10,725
2018 37 399,085 10,786
2019 40 425,377 10,634
2020
New Alex Box 439 4,666,884 10,631
Grand Total 1,306 9,217,512 7,058

“Original” Alex Box Stadium (7,760)

The original Alex Box Stadium, home of the LSU Fighting Tigers from 1938-2008, has a storied history which spans several decades. Efforts to upgrade the stadium over the years made it comparable to that of many professional minor-league clubs. The 2008 season was the last for the Tigers in the 70-year-old facility, as LSU moved into the New Alex Box Stadium in 2009.

In 2008, the Tigers drew 318,798 fans to the original Alex Box Stadium as LSU finished first in the nation in total attendance for the 13th straight year.

Over the final 25 seasons in Alex Box Stadium, the Tigers attracted over four million fans to the historic facility. A  total of 4,550,628 patrons watched the Tigers play at “The Box” from 1984 to 2008.

The stadium was recognized both for its old-fashioned charm and for its modern renovations. Beginning in 1985, it was the site of four SEC tournaments, 18 NCAA regional tournaments, four NCAA super regional series and one ABCA Hall of Fame tournament.

Originally a 2,500-seat facility, the concrete and steel grandstand of Alex Box Stadium was completed in 1938. Funding came from the Works Progress Administration, a federally sponsored agency which constructed public athletic facilities, among other such projects.

In its first two years, Alex Box Stadium was the site of spring training for the New York Giants. Such legendary baseball figures as Mel Ott, Carl Hubbell, Bill Terry and Dick Bartell trained at “The Box.”

LSU’s baseball stadium was named on May 29, 1943, for Alex Box, an outfielder for the 1942 Tiger squad. Box was killed in 1943 while fighting in North Africa during World War II.

Original Alex Box Stadium Facts (known as “LSU Diamond” from 1938-43 seasons)

All-Time LSU Record in the original Alex Box Stadium (1,723 games): 1,217-509-7 (.708)
First Game: March 12, 1938, New York Giants 6, Philadelphia Phillies 5 (Major League Baseball Spring Training game)
First LSU Game: March 21, 1938, LSU led Minnesota, 4-2, after three innings when game is halted due to rain.
First Complete LSU Game: March 24, 1938, Minnesota 6, LSU 5
First LSU Win: April 11, 1938, LSU 7, Northwestern 6
Dedicated to Alex Box by LSU Board of Supervisors: May 29, 1943
Final LSU Game: June 9, 2008 (NCAA Super Regional), LSU 21, UC Irvine 7

Original Alex Box Stadium Information

Seating Capacity 7,760
Playing Field Distances
Foul Lines 330 ft.
Power Alleys 365 ft.
Center 405 ft.
Height of Fence 10 ft.
In center field 15 ft.

Playing Surface
natural grass

Top 10 Paid Attendance Figures at the Original Alex Box Stadium *

Attendance
Opponent
Date
Score
1. 8,701 Mississippi St.
5/11/08
LSU, 9-6
2. 8,675 Indiana
2/22/08
LSU, 7-1
3. 8,683
Houston
3/6/04
UH, 10-5
4. 8,622
UL-Lafayette
4/11/00
LSU, 8-2
5. 8,577
Tulane
2/27/07
UT, 8-3
6. 8,548 Mississippi St.
5/9/08
LSU, 15-6
7. 8,521
Mississippi St.
3/26/04
MSU, 7-3
8. 8,512
Auburn
5/9/03
LSU, 6-5
9. 8,440
Alabama
5/19/02
LSU, 5-1
10. 8,437
Auburn
5/10/03
LSU, 20-3

The largest paid attendance figure in the original stadium was 8,701 versus Mississippi State on May 11, 2008, the final regular-season game in stadium history. The largest actual attendance figure in the original Alex Box Stadium was 8,173 for the NCAA Super Regional championship game versus UC Irvine on June 9, 2008, the final LSU game played in the stadium.

Simeon Alexander “Alex” Box (1920-1943)

LSU’s baseball stadium was named in 1943 for Alex Box, an outfielder for the 1942 Tiger squad. Box was killed in 1943 while fighting in North Africa during World War II.

Simeon Alexander Box was born August 5, 1920, in Quitman, Miss., and attended George S. Gardiner High School in Laurel, Miss. Box came to LSU in 1938 and majored in petroleum engineering. He played football and baseball, served as vice president of the junior class in engineering and was a member of several professional societies. He earned his petroleum engineering degree in 1942.

Box pursued his advanced ROTC studies in the engineering regiment. A handsome, popular figure on campus, he met and developed a close relationship with Earle Hubert, an attractive member of Delta Zeta sorority from Plaquemine, La. They had an understanding that she would complete her elementary education degree while he was serving in the military; then, they would later marry. Tragically, the terrors of warfare changed those plans.

After being commissioned in the U.S. Army, Box made short stops at camps in Florida and Pennsylvania and went on to England in August, 1942. He was posted to the First Infantry Division, called the “Big Red One” in North Africa. Lieutenant Box, a tank commander, displayed his heroism on November 9, 1942, when he risked his life in helping destroy six enemy machine gun nests and an artillery emplacement near Arcole, Algeria. His brave acts earned him the Distinguished Service Cross, the Army’s second-highest decoration.

Only two months later, there was a fierce battle in Tunisia, and Box’s tank was shredded by a German mine. He was killed instantly on February 19, 1943, at the age of 22. Brigadier General Theodore Roosevelt, wrote a letter of condolence to Box’s mother, Mattie, saying “the deeds and death of your son have gone to make up the spiritual background that is this country.”

Laurel, Miss., superintendent of schools R.H. Watkins eulogized Box as a “perfect example of an athlete, a Christian gentleman, a scholar and a soldier … His beautiful life may be compared to a great piece of music which ends on a high note.”

On the LSU campus, there was a spontaneous movement that spring to commemorate his sacrifice in some tangible way. At its May 29, 1943 meeting, the LSU Board of Supervisors voted unanimously to named the baseball stadium for Box. That was considered such an unusual decision that the student newspaper, The Reveille, observed, “For the first time in the school’s history, the service and memory of the military hero came to be esteemed so highly that a structure on the campus was named in his honor.”

The Box family made a special presentation of Alex’s personal memorabilia to LSU during the 1991 baseball season. The memorabilia, enclosed in a specially-constructed glass case, is permanently housed in the Wally Pontiff Jr. Hall of Fame.